Bibliography


Bibliography
  Contents
   I. Introduction 453
   II. Presidential Papers 462
   III. Bibliographies and Encyclopedias 463
   IV. General Surveys 463
   V. The Crash and the Great Depression 465
   VI. Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal 466
   VII. Roosevelt and Foreign Relations in Peace and War 470
   VIII. World War II 472
   IX. World War II at Home 475
   X. Harry S. Truman, the Fair Deal, and McCarthyism 476
   XI. Postwar Foreign Relations, the Cold War, and Korea 480
   XII. African Americans 484
   XIII. Japanese Americans, Hispanics, and Other Minorities 487
   XIV. Labor Movements 489
   XV. Women 490
   XVI. Social Change, Culture, Sport, and Entertainment 492
   I. INTRODUCTION
   The literature covering Franklin D. Roosevelt, the New Deal, World War II, Harry S. Truman, and the Cold War is extensive, to say the least, but very few works cover the entire period from 1933 to 1953 other than the most general facts. Among the better surveys are Ralph de Bedts’s two volumes, Recent American History: 1933 through World War II and Recent American History: 1945 to the Present. A readable broad view is found in Godfrey Hodgson’s America in Our Time: From World War II to Nixon. An excellent study of the first half of the period is David M. Kennedy’s Freedom from Fear: The American People in Depression and War, 1929-1945, while a positive interpretation of the war and postwar years can be found in John Patrick Diggins’s The Proud Decades: America in War and Peace, 1941-1960 and William L. O’Neill’s American High: The Years of Confidence, 1945-1960. A number of useful essays, primarily on labor and politics, can be found in Steve Fraser and Gary Gerstle, eds., The Rise and Fall of the New Deal Order, 1930-1980.
   There are several major studies of Franklin D. Roosevelt, chief among them being the four-volume study, Franklin D. Roosevelt, by Frank B. Freidel, but this ends in 1934. The two volumes by James MacGregor Burns, Roosevelt: The Lion and the Fox and Roosevelt: The Soldier of Freedom, and Arthur Schlesinger’s three-volume set, The Age of Roosevelt, remain valuable for style and content, although more critical studies have since appeared. Ted Morgan’s FDR: A Biography provides a readable comprehensive survey. While the classic singlevolume study of the New Deal remains William E. Leuchtenburg’s Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal, 1932-1940, a recent judicious survey incorporating much of the later writing is Anthony J. Badger’s The New Deal: The Depression Years, 1933-1940. Critical views of the New Deal are included in Barton J. Bernstein’s edited collection Towards a New Past: Dissenting Essays in American History and Alonzo L. Hamby’s edited The New Deal: Analysis and Interpretation. Detailed local studies are provided in John Braeman, Robert H. Bremner, and David Body’s second volume of collected essays, The New Deal: The State and Local Levels; however, much of the focus has shifted away from the top-down politics to the actual experience of the unemployed and disadvantaged, as evidenced by Robert S. McElvaine in The Great Depression: America 1929-1941 and Caroline Bird in The Invisible Scar. A recent short and clear summary of the causes of the Great Depression and the New Deal can be found in Gene Smiley’s Rethinking the Great Depression.
   A good overall survey of U.S. foreign policy during this period is in Stephen E. Ambrose’s Rise to Globalism: American Foreign Policy, 1938-1980, and detailed surveys of U.S. foreign policy during the 1930s can be found in Robert H. Ferrell’s American Diplomacy in the Great Depression and in the more up-to-date study by Robert Dallek, Franklin D. Roosevelt and American Foreign Policy, 1932-1945. David Reynolds provides a good account of the path to war in From Munich to Pearl Harbor: Roosevelt’s America and the Origins of the Second World War, while the developing crisis with Japan is well outlined in Jonathan G. Utley, Going to War with Japan, 1937-1941. And there has been much debate concerning the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, beginning with Charles Beard’s President Roosevelt and the Coming of the War, 1941: A Study in Appearances and Realities, which appeared in 1948 and suggests that Roosevelt deliberately left the fleet open to attack to engineer U.S. entry into the war. Similar claims are repeated in Charles C. Tansill’s Back Door to War: The Roosevelt Foreign Policy, 1933-1941, published four years later. These claims have generally been rejected by the historical profession, beginning with Basil Rauch’s Roosevelt, Munich to Pearl Harbor: A Study in the Creation of a Foreign Policy in 1950, but a revisionist school exemplified by John Toland’s Infamy: Pearl Harbor and Its Aftermath has found the Roosevelt administration culpable to some extent. A recent survey including Japanese contributions can by found in the symposium edited by Hilary Conroy and Harry Wray, Pearl Harbor Re-examined: Prologue to the Pacific War. The Grand Alliance is the subject of many studies, including Simon Berthon’s fairly recent Allies at War: The Bitter Rivalry among Churchill, Roosevelt, and De Gaulle, the older Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin: The War They Waged and the Peace They Sought by Herbert Feis, and the useful collection of essays in David Reynolds, Warren F. Kimball, and A. O. Chubarian’s volume also entitled Allies at War: The Soviet, American, and British Experience, 1939-1945. The amount of writing on the military campaigns during World War II is enormous. A short overall summary covering the American aspects can be found in Martin Folly’s recent study The United States and World War II: The Awakening Giant, and A. Russell Buchanan’s older The United States and World War II is still useful. Several works by Stephen Ambrose and his team of researchers cover many of the aspects of combat in detail. Ambrose’s tendency to portray U.S. forces in a generally positive light has been countered by more realistic views of the American wartime experience in the writing of Michael C. C. Adams in The Best War Ever: America and World War II, John W. Dower in War without Mercy: Race and Power in the Pacific War, Paul Fussell in Wartime: Understanding and Behavior in the Second World War, and Gerald F. Linderman in The World within War: America’s Combat Experience in World War II. While the campaigns in Europe are well covered by Charles B. MacDonald in The Mighty Endeavor: The American War in Europe and Russell F. Weigley in Eisenhower’s Lieutenants: The Campaign of France and Germany, 1944-1945, the war in the Pacific is addressed by Ronald H. Spector in Eagle against the Sun: The American War with Japan and Bernard D. McNalty in War in the Pacific: Pearl Harbor to Tokyo Bay. There are many books dealing with particular battles or features of the war, such as the naval campaigns in the Pacific (for example, Dan Van der Vat in The Pacific Campaign, World War II), and biographies of individual commanders, such as Stanley P. Hirshson on Patton, Carlo D’Este on Eisenhower, Forrest Pogue on Marshall, and Michael Schaller on MacArthur, can be used to complement the various autobiographies. Studs Terkel’s collection of oral memories in “The Good War”: An Oral History of World War Two includes recollections of combat experiences and also adds the civilian perspective on the war, while Kenneth D. Rose provides an invaluable study of military and civilian experience in his Myth and the Greatest Generation: A Social History of Americans in World War II. The U.S. home front is also a popular topic among historians. Richard D. Polenberg provides one of the first detailed analyses in War and Society: The United States, 1941-1945. This was followed by such writers as John Morton Blum in V Was for Victory: Politics and American Culture during World War II and John W. Jeffries in Wartime America: The World War II Home Front, who tend to point to some of the more negative aspects of the war’s domestic impact in terms of labor unrest, race violence, and social and economic disruption. A more positive view of the war years and afterward can be found in William L. O’Neill’s A Democracy at War: American’s Fight at Home and Abroad in World War II.
   Debates about the decision to use the atomic bomb in 1945 continue. The various arguments can be found in Gar Alperovitz’s The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb and the Architecture of an American Myth and in the collection edited by Kai Bird and Lawrence Lifschultz, Hiroshima’s Shadow: Writings on the Denial of History and the Smithsonian Controversy, and Michael Hogan, Hiroshima in History and Memory. Harry S. Truman’s life and presidency is now well covered in the works of Robert H. Ferrell, especially his Harry S. Truman: A Life; David McCullough’s massive Truman; and Alonzo L. Hamby’s shorter study A Man of the People: A Life of Harry S. Truman. Truman’s own Memoirs also offers readable insights. Domestic politics in the Truman years are covered in various biographies, especially in Robert J. Donovan’s two-volume Conflict and Crisis: The Presidency of Harry S. Truman, 1945-1948 and Tumultuous Years: The Presidency of Harry S. Truman. Alonzo L. Hamby provides a useful survey in Beyond the New Deal: Harry S. Truman and American Liberalism, while Susan E. Hartmann gives a detailed account of the president’s relations with Congress in Truman and the 80th Congress. The Fair Deal tends to be overshadowed by the rise of McCarthyism, a subject that has attracted a great deal of attention, ranging from the several biographical studies of McCarthy himself (for example, those by Richard H. Rovere and Thomas C. Reeves), to those dealing with the phenomenon of Mc- Carthyism. Useful studies of this are David Caute’s The Great Fear: The Anti-Communist Purge under Truman and Eisenhower, Richard Fried’s Nightmare in Red: The McCarthy Era in Perspective, and Robert Griffith’s The Politics of Fear: Joseph R. McCarthy and the Senate. Athan G. Theoharis locates the origins of McCarthyism with the Truman loyalty program and Cold War policies in Seeds of Repression: Harry S. Truman and the Origins of McCarthyism, while Michael J. Heale provides a useful longer perspective in American Anticommunism: Combating the Enemy Within, 1830-1970. A helpful oral history is Griffin Fariello’s collection Red Scare: Memories of the American Inquisition, an Oral History. The rise of domestic surveillance and the role of the Federal Bureau of Investigation are thoroughly handled in the Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones’s recent detailed study The FBI: A History. Much of the focus of the writing on the Truman years is on the history of the Cold War. This has almost come full circle, beginning with the original orthodox views justifying the position of the United States and Harry S. Truman as defenders of liberal democracy in the face of aggressive Soviet expansionism, such as William H. McNeill in America, Britain, and Russia: Their Co-operation and Conflict, 1941-1946 and Herbert Feis in From Trust to Terror: The Onset of the Cold War. Such arguments are also subjected to much critical reappraisal from such writers as Gabriel Kolko, Lloyd Gardner, Daniel Yergin, and others. The latest position—much closer to the original writers but offering a more balanced view recognizing the complexities of wartime and postwar relations—can be found in the several books of John L. Gaddis and those of Thomas G. Paterson and Alonzo L. Hamby. These different interpretations are collected in Thomas G. Paterson and Robert J. McMahon, eds., The Origins of the Cold War, while Peter G. Boyle provides a fine overview of the whole subject in American-Soviet Relations: From the Russian Revolution to the Fall of Communism.
   Although the Korean War often tends to be described as the “forgotten” war, it provoked considerable debate among historians as to its causes and its conduct. Bruce Cumings provides a detailed two-volume account in The Origins of the Korean War, and Burton I. Kaufman’s more recent study of The Korean War: Challenges in Crisis, Credibility, and Command is also useful. Rosemary Foot locates the conflict in the context of broader U.S. polices with regard to China. The conflict between Truman and Douglas MacArthur is well handled in John W. Spanier’s The Truman-MacArthur Controversy and the Korean War. The 1930s and 1940s were tumultuous years for different social groups as they were affected in turn by depression, war, ideological conflict, and developing government social welfare policy. While the focus of much of the writing on African American history is on the civil rights movement that appeared from 1955 onward, the significance of the earlier decades has been increasingly recognized. A good overview incorporating much of the new literature can be found in Robert J. Norrell’s The House I Live In: Race in the American Century and in the useful surveys of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People by Manfred Berg, “Ticket to Freedom”: The NAACP and the Struggle for Black Political Integration, and Gilbert Jonas, Freedom’s Sword: The NAACP and the Struggle against Racism in America, 1909-1969. Studies of the African American experience of the Great Depression and New Deal include Cheryl Lynn Greenberg’s study of Harlem, “Or Does It Explode”: Black Harlem in the Great Depression, the essays in Bernard Sternsher’s edited collection, The Negro in Depression and War: Prelude to Revolution, 1930-1945, Harvard Sitkoff’s A New Deal for Blacks: The Emergence of Civil Rights as a National Issue, and Patricia Sullivan’s more recent Days of Hope: Race and Democracy in the New Deal Era. The political effects of the New Deal on the black population are examined in John B. Kirby’s Black Americans in the Roosevelt Era: Liberalism and Race and Nancy J. Weiss’s Farewell to the Party of Lincoln: Black Politics in the Age of FDR. Studies of such individuals as Walter White by Kenneth Janken and A. Philip Randolph by Paula Pfeffer are also useful for both the 1930s and the war years.
   The impact of World War II on race is examined from the military aspect in several works, including Richard M. Dalfiume’s detailed Fighting on Two Fronts: Desegregation of the U.S. Armed Forces, 1939-1953 and Christopher P. Moore’s Fighting for America: Black Soldiers, the Unsung Heroes of World War II. The overall effects of the war on black life is the subject of Neil A. Wynn’s The Afro-American and the Second World War, while the significance of the war in terms of changing government policy is the focus of Merl E. Reed’s Seedtime for the Modern Civil Rights Movement: The President’s Committee on Fair Employment Practice, 1941--1946 and Daniel Kryder’s Divided Arsenal: Race and the American State during World War II. Race relations in the postwar period and Truman years are examined in William C. Berman, The Politics of Civil Rights in the Truman Administration, Michael R.Gardner, Harry Truman and Civil Rights: Moral Courage and Political Risks, and Mary L. Dudziak, Cold War Civil Rights: Race and the Image of American Democracy.
   The importance of these years for other minority groups has recently gained greater recognition. The treatment of Japanese Americans during World War II, in particular, has come under considerable scrutiny most notably in the work of Roger Daniels, Concentration Camps USA: Japanese Americans and World War II; however, more and more writing is being produced by Japanese Americans themselves, including Brian Masaru Hayashi, Democratizing the Enemy: The Japanese-American Internment, Gary Y. Okihiro, Whispered Silences: Japanese Americans and World War II, and the longer study by David Yoo, Growing up Nisei: Race, Generation, and Culture among Japanese Americans of California, 1924-1949. The legal aspects of the relocation of Japanese Americans are discussed fully in Peter H. Irons’s scholarly study Justice at War: The Story of the Japanese-American Internment Cases. The history of Mexican Americans during the 1930s and the war years is examined in Abraham Hoffman’s Unwanted Mexican Americans: Repatriation Pressures during the Great Depression, Erasmo Gamboa’s Mexican Labor and World War II: Braceros in the Pacific Northwest, 1942-1947, and the collection of essays edited by Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez, Mexican Americans and World War II. Several studies also examine Native Americans in this period, chief among them being Kenneth R. Philip’s John Collier’s Crusade for Indian Reform, 1920-1954, Graham D. Taylor’s The New Deal and American Indian Tribalism: The Administration of the Indian Reorganization Act, 1934-1945, and Alison R. Bernstein’s American Indians and World War II: Toward a New Era in Indian Affairs. An aspect of the military role played by Native Americans is the subject of Margaret T. Bixler’s Winds of Freedom: The Story of the Navajo Code Talkers of World War II.
   Information on labor history during this period is not as plentiful as for some other subjects. The classic studies are the two volumes by Irving Bernstein, The Turbulent Years: A History of the American Worker, 1933-1941 and A Caring Society: The New Deal, the Worker, and the Great Depression, while a good short overview can be found in Robert H. Zieger, American Workers, American Unions, 1920-1945, and his The CIO, 1935-1955. Useful essays can be found in the collections by David Brody, Workers in Industrial America: Essays on the 20th-Century Struggle, and David Montgomery, Workers Control in America: Studies in the History of Work, Technology, and Labor Struggles. Biographies of such key figures as Melvyn Dubofsky and John Van Tine’s of John L. Lewis and Nelson N. Lichtenstein’s of Walter Reuther are also extremely useful. Lichtenstein’s study Labor’s War at Home: The CIO in World War II and Andrew E. Kersten’s Labor’s Home Front: The American Federation of Labor during World War II are the best detailed treatments of wartime labor policies and their consequences. Truman’s relations with trade unions and the labor movement are the subject of Arthur F. McClure’s The Truman Administration and Problems of Postwar Labor, 1945-1948. More recent perspectives can be found in the essays edited by Robert W. Cherny, William Issel, and Kieran Walsh Taylor, American Labor and the Cold War: Grassroots Politics and Postwar Popular Culture.
   The experience of women during the 1930s and 1940s has become an increasingly popular area of research. While broad surveys such as Carl N. Degler’s At Odds: Women and the Family in America from the Revolution to the Present or William H. Chafe’s narrower The Paradox of Change: American Women in the 20th Century both provide useful starting points, there are now many more specialized studies available.
   Susan Ware’s two books, Beyond Suffrage: Women in the New Deal and Holding Their Own: American Women in the 1930s, and Lois Scharf in To Work and to Wed: Female Employment, Feminism, and the Great Depression both offer useful insights into women’s experience of the Great Depression and New Deal.
   A great deal of writing exists on the war years, much of it concerned directly or indirectly with the debate about the long-term significance of the war for women and the women’s movement. The most important works on this subject are now probably D’Ann Campbell’s Women at War with America: Private Lives in a Patriotic Age, Sherna Berger Gluck’s Rosie the Riveter Revisited: Women, the War, and Social Change, and Emily Yellin’s Our Mother’s War: American Women at Home and at the Front during World War II. Susan M. Hartmann takes the story into the postwar with The Home Front and Beyond: American Women in the 1940s, as do Eugenia Kaledin in Mothers and More: American Women in the 1950s and the contributors to Joanne Meyerowitz’s edited collection, Not June Cleaver: Women and Gender in Postwar America, 1945-1960. The apparent return of women to domesticity after the war is the subject of Betty Friedan’s seminal work,
   The Feminine Mystique, and related issues are dealt with in Elaine Tyler May’s fascinating Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era.
   The social, demographic, and cultural changes brought about by the successive effects of the Great Depression, World War II, and the Cold War are dealt with in many of the general texts already listed above.
   The essays in Lawrence W. Levine, The Unpredictable Past: Explorations in American Cultural History, are regarded as essential starting points. On the 1930s, McElvaine’s The Great Depression: America 1929-1941 makes many good points on social and cultural history, and some valuable insights can be found in the essays edited by Stephen W. Baskerville and Ralph Willett, Nothing Else to Fear: New Perspectives on America in the Thirties. A contemporary view is provided in Frederick Lewis Allen, Since Yesterday: The 1930s in America, although some of his observations would be questioned by more recent writers.
   A key work, particularly with reference to photography, is William Stott’s Documentary Expression in Thirties America. Film is dealt with in a number of useful studies. John Baxter in Hollywood in the Thirties and Charles Higham and Joel Greenberg in Hollywood in the Forties provide good basic descriptions of many of the films released during these two decades. Content is discussed more by Robert Sklar in his excellent Movie-Made America: A Social History of American Movies and also in the very useful collection of essays edited by Steven Mintz and Randy Roberts in Hollywood’s America: United States History through Its Films.
   The standard work on film during the war years is Clayton R. Koppes and Gregory D. Black’s Hollywood Goes to War: How Politics and Propaganda Shaped World War II Movies, while Richard R. Lingeman’s readable Don’t You Know There’s a War On? The American Home Front, 1941-1945 provides a great deal of stimulating detail about the full range of social and cultural matters during the war. Steven J. Whitfield offers a more academic approach in The Culture of the Cold War, and the subject of film is the focus of Nora Sayre in Running Time: Films of the Cold War. The essays in Elaine McClarnand and Steve Goodson’s edited collection The Impact of the Cold War on American Popular Culture offer a useful broader view. The effects of the war and postwar years on intellectual thought and ideas are examined in William S. Graebner’s The Age of Doubt: American Thought and Culture in the 1940s, while Paul Boyer and Margot A. Henriksen focus specifically on the impact of the birth of the atomic age in By the Bomb’s Early Light: American Thought and Culture at the Dawn of the Atomic Age and Dr. Strangelove’s America: Society and Culture in the Atomic Age, respectively.
   A useful broad overview of media and the arts in the postwar period can be found in Richard Alan Schwartz, Cold War Culture: Media and the Arts, 1945-1990.
   II. PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS
   The records of the Roosevelt and Truman administrations are housed at the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library in Hyde Park, New York, and the Harry S. Truman Library in Independence, Missouri. Public papers and speeches of the presidents can also be found at The American Presidency Project at www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/. The Public Papers and Addresses of Franklin D. Roosevelt, edited by Samuel Rosenman and Public Papers of the Presidents: Harry S. Truman 1945-1953, 8 volumes, Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1961-1966 are a valuable source.
   III. BIBLIOGRAPHIES AND ENCYCLOPEDIAS
   The most useful source for biographical information is without a doubt
 ■ John A. Garraty and Mark Carnes, eds., The American National Biography (1999), published by Oxford University Press and available online at http://www.anb.org.
 ■ Agnew, Jean Christophe, and Roy Rosenzweig, eds. A Companion to Post-1945 America. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2005.
   Biographical Dictionary of the United States Congress Online. Available from http://bioguide.congress.gov.
 ■ Boyer, Paul S., ed. The Oxford Companion to United States History. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.
 ■ Carnes, Mark C., ed. American History. New York: Simon & Schuster/ Macmillan, 1996.
 ■ Ciment, James, ed. Encyclopedia of the Great Depression and New Deal. Armonk, N.Y.: M. E. Sharpe, 2000.
 ■ Graham, Otis L., and Meghan Robinson Wander, eds. Franklin D. Roosevelt: His Life and Times, An Encyclopedic View. New York: Da Capo Press, 1985.
 ■ Kirkendall, Paul S., ed. The Harry Truman Encyclopedia. Boston: G. K. Hall & Co., 1989.
 ■ Kort, Michael. The Columbia Guide to the Cold War. New York: Columbia University Press, 2001.
 ■ Olson, James S. Historical Dictionary of the 1950s. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 2000.
 ■ ———. Historical Dictionary of the Great Depression, 1929-1940. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 2001.
 ■ ———. Historical Dictionary of the New Deal: From Inauguration to Preparation for War. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Publishing, 1985.
 ■ Polmar, Norman B., and Thomas B Allen. World War II: America at War, 1941-1945. New York: Random House, 1991.
 ■ Smith, Joseph, and Simon Davis. Historical Dictionary of the Cold War. Lanham, Md., and London: Scarecrow Press, 2000.
 ■ Whitfield, Stephen J., ed. A Companion to 20th-Century America. Malden, Mass. and Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.
   IV. GENERAL SURVEYS
 ■ Allen, Frederick Lewis. Since Yesterday: The Nineteen-Thirties in America. 1940. Reprint, New York: Bantam Books, 1965.
 ■ Ambrose, Stephen E. Rise to Globalism: American Foreign Policy, 1938-1980. New York: Penguin Books, 1980.
 ■ De Bedts, Ralph F. Recent American History: 1933 through World War II. Vol. I. Homewood, Ill.: Dorsey Press, 1973.
 ■ ———. Recent American History: 1945 to the Present. Vol. II. Homewood, Ill.: Dorsey Press, 1973.
 ■ Diggins, John Patrick. The Proud Decades: America in War and Peace, 1941-1960. New York: Norton, 1988.
 ■ Goldman, Eric F. The Crucial Decade—and After: America, 1945-1960. New York: Vintage, 1961.
 ■ Halberstam, David. The Fifties. New York: Villard Books, 1993.
 ■ Hodgson, Godfrey. America in Our Time: From World War II to Nixon. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1976.
 ■ Hofstadter, Richard. The Age of Reform: From Bryan to FDR. New York Alfred A. Knopf, 1955.
 ■ Karl, Barry P. The Uneasy State: The United States from 1915 to 1945. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1983.
 ■ Kempton, Murray. America Comes of Middle Age: Columns, 1950-1962. Boston: Little, Brown, 1963.
 ■ Kennedy, David M. Freedom from Fear: The American People in Depression and War, 1929-1945. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
 ■ Kirkendall, Richard S. The United States, 1929-1945: Years of Crisis and Change. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1973.
 ■ Leuchtenburg, William E. A Troubled Feast: American Society since 1945. Boston: Little, Brown, 1973.
 ■ Levine, Lawrence. The Unpredictable Past: Explorations in American Cultural History. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.
 ■ Manchester, William. The Glory and the Dream: A Narrative History of America, 1932-1972. Boston: Little, Brown, 1974.
 ■ Nash, Gerald D. The Crucial Era: The Great Depression and World War II, 1929-1945. New York: St. Martins Press, 1992.
 ■ O’Neill, William L. American High: The Years of Confidence, 1945-1960. New York: Free Press, 1986.
 ■ Perrett, Geoffrey. A Dream of Greatness: The American People, 1945-1963. New York: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan, 1979.
 ■ Polenberg, Richard D. One Nation Divisible: Class, Race, and Ethnicity in the United States. New York: Viking Press, 1980.
 ■ Sherry, Michael S. In the Shadow of War: The United States since the 1930s. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1995.
 ■ Susman, Warren I. Culture as History: The Transformation of American Society in the Twentieth Century. New York: Pantheon Books, 1984.
 ■ Zinn, Howard. Postwar America: 1945-1971. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1973.
   V. THE CRASH AND THE GREAT DEPRESSION
 ■ Bernstein, Irving. The Lean Years: A History of the American Worker, 1920-1933. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1960.
 ■ Bernstein, Michael A. The Great Depression: Delayed Recovery and Economic Change in America, 1929-1939. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987.
 ■ Bird, Caroline. The Invisible Scar. New York: McKay, 1966.
 ■ Bordo, Michael D., Claudia Goldin, and Eugene N. White, eds. The Defining Moment: The Great Depression and the American Economy in the Twentieth Century. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998.
 ■ Chandler, Lester V. America’s Greatest Depression, 1919-1941. New York: Harper, 1970.
 ■ Daniels, Roger. The Bonus March: An Episode of the Great Depression. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1941.
 ■ Fearon, Peter. War, Prosperity, and Depression, 1919-1941. Deddington, Oxfordshire: Philip Allan, 1987.
 ■ Fite, Gilbert C. American Farmers: The New Majority. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1981.
 ■ Friedman, Milton, and Anna Jacobson Schwartz. The Great Contraction, 1929-1933. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1965.
 ■ Galbraith, John Kenneth. The Great Crash: 1929. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1955.
 ■ Garraty, John A. The Great Depression: An Inquiry into the Causes, Course, and Consequences of the Worldwide Depression of the 1930s. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1986.
 ■ Klingaman, William K. 1929: The Year of the Great Crash. New York: Harper & Row, 1989.
 ■ Lowitt, Richard, and Maurine Beasley, eds. One Third of a Nation: Lorena Hickok Reports on the Great Depression. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1981.
 ■ McElvaine, Robert S. Down and Out in the Great Depression: Letters from the Forgotten Man. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1983.
 ■ ———. The Great Depression: America 1929-1941. New York: Times Books, 1984.
 ■ Pells, Richard H. Radical Visions and American Dreams: Culture and Social Thought in the Depression Years. New York: Harper & Row, 1973.
 ■ Rosen, Elliott. Hoover, Roosevelt, and the Brains Trust: From Depression to New Deal. New York: Columbia University Press, 1977.
 ■ Rothbard, Murray N. America’s Greatest Depression. Princeton, N.J.: D. Van Nostrand, 1963.
 ■ Schlesinger, Arthur M., Jr. The Age of Roosevelt: The Politics of Upheaval. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1960.
 ■ Smiley, Gene. Rethinking the Great Depression. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 2002.
 ■ Sobel, Robert. The Great Bull Market: Wall Street in the 1920s. New York: W. W. Norton, 1968.
 ■ Terkel, Studs. Hard Times: An Oral History of the Great Depression. New York: Pantheon Books, 1970.
 ■ Thomas, Gordon, and M. Morgan-Witts. The Day the Bubble Burst: A Social History of the Wall Street Crash of 1929. New York: Doubleday, 1979.
 ■ Watkins, T. H. The Great Depression: America in the 1930s. Boston: Little, Brown, 1993.
 ■ Worster, Donald L. Dust Bowl: The Southern Plains in the 1930s. New York: Oxford University Press, 1979.
   VI. FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT AND THE NEW DEAL
 ■ Allswang, John. The New Deal and American Politics: A Study in Political Change. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1978.
 ■ Amenta, Edwin. When Movements Matter: The Townsend Plan and the Rise of Social Security. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2006.
 ■ Badger, Anthony J. The New Deal: The Depression Years, 1933-1940. New York: Hill & Wang, 1989.
 ■ Baskerville, Stephen W., and Ralph, Willett, eds. Nothing Else to Fear: New Perspectives on America in the Thirties. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1985.
 ■ Bennett, David H. Demagogues in the Depression: American Radicals and the Union Party, 1932-1936. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1969.
 ■ Bernstein, Barton J., ed. Towards a New Past: Dissenting Essays in American History. New York: Random House, 1987.
 ■ Best, Gary Dean. Herbert Hoover: The Postpresidential Years, 1933-1964. Stanford, Calif.: Hoover Institution Press, 1983.
 ■ ———. Pride, Prejudice, and Politics: Roosevelt versus Recovery, 1933-1938. New York: Praeger, 1991.
 ■ Biles, Roger. A New Deal for the American People. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 1991.
 ■ Black, Allida. Casting Her Own Shadow: Eleanor Roosevelt and the Shaping of Postwar Liberalism. New York: Columbia University Press, 1996.
 ■ ———. Courage in a Dangerous World: The Political Writings of Eleanor Roosevelt. New York: Columbia University Press, 1999.
 ■ Blum, John Morton. Roosevelt and Morgenthau. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1970.
 ■ Braeman, John, Robert H. Bremner, and David Brody, eds. The New Deal: The National Level. Vol. 1. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1975.
 ■ ———. The New Deal: The State and Local Levels. Vol. 2. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1975.
 ■ Brewer, Jeutonne P. The Federal Writers’ Project: A Bibliography. Metuchen, N.H.: Scarecrow Press, 1994.
 ■ Brindas, Kenneth J. All of the Music Belongs to the Nation: The WPA’s Federal Music Project. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1995.
 ■ Brinkley, Alan. Voices of Protest: Huey Long, Father Coughlin, and the Great Depression. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1982.
 ■ Burns, James MacGregor. Roosevelt: The Lion and the Fox. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1956.
 ■ ———. Roosevelt: The Soldier of Freedom. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1970.
 ■ Clarke, Jeanne N. Roosevelt’s Warrior: Harold Ickes and the New Deal. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996.
 ■ Cohen, Wilbur J. The Roosevelt New Deal: A Program Assessment Fifty Years After. Austin: Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, 1986.
 ■ Coker, Jeffrey W. Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Biography. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2005.
 ■ Conkin, Paul K. The New Deal. 2nd ed. Arlington Heights, Ill.: Harlan Davidson, 1975.
 ■ Cook, Blanche Wiesen. Eleanor Roosevelt: Volume I, 1884-1933. New York: Viking Press, 1992.
 ■ ———. Eleanor Roosevelt: Volume II, 1933-1938. New York: Viking Press, 1999.
 ■ Cushman, Barry. Rethinking the New Deal Court: The Structure of a Constitutional Revolution. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.
 ■ Davis, Kenneth S. FDR, the New Deal Years, 1933-1937. New York: Random House, 1986.
 ■ Dubofsky, Melvyn. The New Deal: Conflicting Interpretations and Shifting Perspectives. New York: Garland Publishers, 1990.
 ■ Eden, Robert, ed. The New Deal and Its Legacy: Critique and Appraisal. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1989.
 ■ Edsforth, Ronald. The New Deal: America’s Response to the Great Depression. New York: Blackwell Publishers, 2000.
 ■ Einaudi, Mario. The Roosevelt Revolution. New York: Harper & Row, 1959.
 ■ Finan, Christopher M. Alfred E. Smith: The Happy Warrior. New York: Hill & Wang, 2002.
 ■ Fraser, Steve, and Gary Gerstle, eds. The Rise and Fall of the New Deal Order, 1930-1980. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1989.
 ■ Freidel, Frank B. The Apprenticeship. Vol. 1 of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Boston: Little, Brown, 1952.
 ■ ———. The Ordeal. Vol. 2 of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Boston: Little, Brown, 1954.
 ■ ———. The Triumph. Vol. 3 of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Boston: Little, Brown, 1956.
 ■ ———. Launching the New Deal. Vol. 4 of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Boston: Little, Brown, 1973.
 ■ ———. Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Rendezvous with Destiny. Boston: Little, Brown & Co., 1990.
 ■ Garson, Robert A. The Democratic Party and the Politics of Sectionalism, 1941-1948. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1974.
 ■ Goodwin, Doris Kearns. No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995.
 ■ Graham, Otis L. The New Deal. Boston: Little, Brown, 1973.
 ■ Greenbaum, Fred. Fighting Progressive: A Biography of Edward P. Costigan. Washington, D.C.: Public Affairs Press, 1971.
 ■ Hamby, Alonzo L., ed. The New Deal: Analysis and Interpretation. New York and London: Longman, 1981.
 ■ Hamilton, David E. The New Deal. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin, 1999.
 ■ Hawley, Ellis. The New Deal and the Problem of Monopoly. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1966.
 ■ Hirsh, Jerrold. Portrait of America: A Cultural History of the Federal Writers’ Project. Chapel Hill: North Carolina Press, 2003.
 ■ Hopkins, June. Harry Hopkins: Sudden Hero, Brash Reformer. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1999.
 ■ Huthmacher, J. Joseph. Senator Robert F. Wagner and the Rise of Urban Liberalism. New York: Atheneum, 1971.
 ■ Lash, Joseph P. Eleanor and Franklin. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1971.
 ■ Leuchtenburg, William E. Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal, 1932-1940. New York: Harper & Row, 1963.
 ■ ———. The New Deal: A Documentary History . New York: Harper & Row, 1968.
 ■ ———. “The New Deal and the Analogue of War.” In Change and Continuity in Twentieth Century America, edited by John Braeman, Robert H. Bremner, and Everett Waters. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1964.
 ■ ———. The Supreme Court Reborn: The Constitutional Revolution in the Age of Roosevelt. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.
 ■ Levine, Rhonda. Class Struggle and the New Deal: Industrial Labor, Industrial Capital, and the State. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1988.
 ■ Louchheim, Katie. The Making of the New Deal: The Insiders Speak. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1983.
 ■ McCoy, Donald. Angry Voices: Left-of-Center Politics in the New Deal Era. Lawrence: University of Kansas, 1958.
 ■ ———. Landon of Kansas. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1967.
 ■ McJimsey, George T. T. Harry Hopkins: Ally of the Poor and Defender of Democracy. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1987.
 ■ Mettler, Suzanne. Dividing Citizens: Gender and Federalism in New Deal Public Policy. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1998.
 ■ Morgan, Ted. FDR: A Biography. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1985.
 ■ Parrish, Michael E. Felix Frankfurter and His Times: The Reform Years. New York: Free Press, 1982.
 ■ Patterson, James T. Congressional Conservatism and the New Deal: The Growth of the Conservative Coalition in Congress, 1933-1939, Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1967.
 ■ ———. Mr. Republican: A Biography of Robert A. Taft. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1972.
 ■ Polenberg, Richard D. The Era of Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1933-1945: A Brief History with Documents. Boston and New York: Bedford/St. Martin’s Press, 2000.
 ■ Reagan, Patrick D. Designing a New America: The Origins of New Deal Planning, 1890-1943. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2000.
 ■ Rogow, Arnold. James Forrestal, a Study of Personality, Politics, and Policy. New York: Macmillan, 1963.
 ■ Romasco, Albert U. The Politics of Recovery: Roosevelt’s New Deal. New York: Oxford University Press, 1983.
 ■ Roosevelt, Eleanor. The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt. New York: Da Capo Press, 1992.
 ■ Rosenman, Samuel I. The Public Papers and Addresses of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. 4 vols. New York: Macmillan, 1941.
 ■ Rozell, Mark J., and William D. Pederson, eds. FDR and the Modern Presidency: Leadership and Legacy. Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 1997.
 ■ Salmond, John. The Civilian Conservation Corps, 1933-1942. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1967.
 ■ Saloutos, Theodore. American Farmers and the New Deal. Ames: Iowa State University Press, 1982.
 ■ Schlesinger, Arthur M., Jr. The Crisis of the Old Order. Vol. 1 of The Age of Roosevelt. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1956.
 ■ ———. The Coming of the New Deal. Vol. 2 of The Age of Roosevelt. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1958.
 ■ ———. The Politics of Upheaval. Vol. 3 of The Age of Roosevelt. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1960.
 ■ Schwarz, Jordan A. The New Dealers: Power Politics in the Age of Roosevelt. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1993.
 ■ Sternsher, Bernard. Hope Restored: How the New Deal Worked in Town and Country. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1999.
 ■ Tindall, George Brown. The Emergence of the New South, 1913-1945. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1967.
 ■ Tugwell, Rexford. The Brains Trust. New York: Viking Press, 1968.
 ■ Venn, Fiona. The New Deal. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1998.
 ■ Ward, Geoffrey C. Before the Trumpet: Young Franklin Roosevelt, 1882-1905. New York: Harper & Row, 1985.
 ■ ———. A First Class Temperament: The Emergence of Franklin Roosevelt. New York: Harper & Row, 1992.
 ■ Warren, Donald I. Radio Priest: Charles Coughlin, the Father of Hate Radio. New York: Free Press, 1996.
 ■ Warren, Frank A. An Alternative Vision: The Socialist Party in the 1930s. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1976.
 ■ White, G. Edward. The Constitution and the New Deal. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2000.
 ■ White, Graham, and John Maze. Harold Ickes of the New Deal: His Private Life and Public Career. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1985.
 ■ ———. Henry A. Wallace: His Search for a New World Order. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1995.
 ■ Williams, Harry T. Huey Long. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1969.
 ■ Winkler, Allan M. Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Making of Modern America. New York and London: Longman, 2006.
 ■ Zinn, Howard, ed. New Deal Thought. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1966.
   VII. ROOSEVELT AND FOREIGN RELATIONS IN PEACE AND WAR
 ■ Adler, Selig. The Isolationist Impulse. New York: Free Press, 1957.
 ■ Berthon, Simon. Allies at War: The Bitter Rivalry among Churchill, Roosevelt, and De Gaulle. New York: Carroll & Graf, 2001.
 ■ Cashman, Sean D. America, Roosevelt, and World War II. New York: New York University Press, 1989.
 ■ Cole, Wayne S. Roosevelt and the Isolationists, 1932-1945. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1983.
 ■ Dallek, Robert. Franklin D. Roosevelt and American Foreign Policy, 1932-1945. New York: Oxford University Press, 1979.
 ■ De Conde, Alexander, ed. Isolation and Security. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1957.
 ■ Divine, Robert A. The Illusion of Neutrality. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1962.
 ■ ———. The Reluctant Belligerent. New York: Wiley, 1965.
 ■ Feis, Herbert. Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin: The War They Waged and the Peace They Sought. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1957.
 ■ Ferrell, Robert H. American Diplomacy in the Great Depression. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1957.
 ■ Gellman, Irwin F. Good Neighbor Diplomacy. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1979.
 ■ ———. Secret Affairs: Franklin Roosevelt, Cordell Hull, and Sumner Welles. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995.
 ■ Jonas, Manfred. Isolationism in America, 1935-1941. Chicago: Imprint Publications, 1990.
 ■ Kimball, Warren F. Forged in War: Roosevelt, Churchill, and the Second World War. New York: W. Morrow, 1997.
 ■ Langer, William L., and S. Everett Gleason. The Challenge to Isolation, 1937-1940. New York: Harper, 1952.
 ■ Marks, Frederick W. Wind over Sand: The Diplomacy of Franklin Roosevelt. Athens: University of Georgia, 1988.
 ■ Nixon, Edgar B., ed. Franklin D. Roosevelt and Foreign Affairs. 3 vols. Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1969.
 ■ Reynolds, David. From Munich to Pearl Harbor: Roosevelt’s America and the Origins of the Second World War. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 2001.
 ■ Reynolds, David, Warren F. Kimball, and A. O. Chubarian, eds. Allies at War: The Soviet, American, and British Experience, 1939-1945. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1994.
 ■ Sainsbury, Keith. The Turning Point: Roosevelt, Stalin, Churchill, and Chiang-Kai-Shek, 1943: The Moscow, Cairo, and Teheran Conferences. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985.
 ■ Schaller, Michael. The U.S. Crusade in China, 1938-1945. New York: Columbia University Press, 1979.
 ■ Schewe, Donald. Franklin D. Roosevelt and Foreign Affairs. 11 vols. New York: Clearwater, 1969.
 ■ Wood, Bryce. The Making of the Good Neighbor Policy. New York: Columbia University Press, 1961.
 ■ Wyman, David S. The Abandonment of the Jews: America and the Holocaust, 1941-1945. New York: Pantheon Books, 1984.
   VIII. WORLD WAR II
 ■ Adams, Michael C. C. The Best War Ever: America and World War II. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993.
 ■ Alperovitz, Gar. The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb and the Architecture of an American Myth. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1995.
 ■ Ambrose, Stephen E. Band of Brothers: E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne from Normandy to Hitler’s Eagle’s Nest. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2001.
 ■ ———. Citizen Soldiers: The U.S. Army from the Normandy Beaches to the Bulge to the Surrender of Germany, June 7, 1944-May 7, 1945. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1997.
 ■ ———. D-Day: June 6, 1944: The Climactic Battle of World War II. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1994.
 ■ ———. Eisenhower and Berlin, 1945: The Decision to Halt at the Elbe. New York: W. W. Norton, 1967.
 ■ ———. Ike: Abilene to Berlin: The Life of Dwight D. Eisenhower from His Childhood in Abilene, Kansas, through His Command of the Allied Forces in Europe in World War II. New York: Harper & Row 1973.
 ■ ———. The Supreme Commander: The War Years of General Dwight D. Eisenhower. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1970.
 ■ Beard, Charles, President Roosevelt and the Coming of War, 1941: A Study in Appearances and Realities. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1948.
 ■ Bird, Kai, and Lawrence Lifschultz, eds. Hiroshima’s Shadow: Writings on the Denial of History and the Smithsoniam Controversy. New York: Pamphleteer’s Press, 1997.
 ■ Blumenson, Martin. Patton, the Man behind the Legend, 1885-1945. New York: Morrow, 1985.
 ■ Bradley, James, with Ron Powers. Flags of Our Fathers. London: Pimlico, 2000.
 ■ Bradley, Omar Nelson, and Clay Blair. A General’s Life: An Autobiography. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1983.
 ■ Brokaw, Tom. The Greatest Generation. New York: Random House, 1998.
 ■ Buchanan, A. Russell. The United States and World War II. New York: Harper, 1964.
 ■ Conroy, Hilary, and Harry Wray, eds. Pearl Harbor Re-examined: Prologue to the Pacific War. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1990.
 ■ Cray, Ed. General of the Army: George C. Marshall, Soldier and Statesman. New York: W.W. Norton, 1990.
 ■ Davis, Kenneth S. FDR: The War President, 1940-1943: A History. New York: Random House, 2000.
 ■ D’Este, Carlo. Eisenhower: A Soldier’s Life. New York: Henry Holt, 2002.
 ■ ———. Patton: A Genius for War. New York: HarperCollins, 1995.
 ■ Doubler, Michael D. Closing with the Enemy: How GIs Fought the War in Europe, 1944-1945. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1994.
 ■ Dower, John W. War without Mercy: Race and Power in the Pacific War. New York: Pantheon Books, 1986.
 ■ Feis, Herbert. The Road to Pearl Harbor: The Coming of the War between the United States and Japan. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1950.
 ■ Folly, Martin. The United States and World War II: The Awakening Giant. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2002.
 ■ Fussell, Paul. The Boy’s Crusade: American GIs in Europe: Chaos and Fear in World War Two. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2004.
 ■ ———. Wartime: Understanding and Behavior in the Second World War. New York: Oxford University Press, 1989.
 ■ Gambone, Michael D. The Greatest Generation Comes Home: The Veteran in American Society. College Station, Tex.: Texas A&M University Press, 2005.
 ■ Gelb, Norman. Desperate Venture: The Story of Operation Torch, the Allied Invasion of North Africa. New York: W. Morrow, 1992.
 ■ Hastings, Max. Nemesis: The Battle for Japan, 1944-1945. London: Harper Press, 2007.
 ■ Hess, Gary R. The United States at War, 1941-1945. Wheeling, Ill.: Harlan Davidson, 2000.
 ■ Hirshson, Stanley P. General Patton: A Soldier’s Life. New York: HarperCollins, 2002.
 ■ Hogan, Michael, ed. Hiroshima in History and Memory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.
 ■ Hoyt, Edwin Palmer. How They Won the War in the Pacific: Nimitz and His Admirals. New York: Weybright and Talley, 1970.
 ■ Kelly, Orr. Meeting the Fox: The Allied Invasion of Africa, from Operation Torch to Kasserine Pass to Victory in Tunisia. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2002.
 ■ Kennett, Lee. G.I.: The American Soldier in World War II. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1987.
 ■ Lamb, Richard. War in Italy, 1943-1945: A Brutal Story. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1993.
 ■ Landis, Kenneth, and Rex Gunn. Deceit at Pearl Harbor: From Pearl Harbor to Midway. Bloomington, Indiana: 1st Books Library, 2002.
 ■ Leckie, Robert. Challenge for the Pacific: Guadalcanal, the Turning Point of the War. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1965.
 ■ Lifton, Robert J., and Greg Mitchell. Hiroshima in America: Fifty Years of Denial. New York: Putnam, 1995.
 ■ Linderman, Gerald F. The World within War: America’s Combat Experience in World War II. New York: Free Press, 1997.
 ■ Love, Jr., Robert W. Pearl Harbor Revisited. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1995.
 ■ MacDonald, Charles B. The Mighty Endeavor: The American War in Europe. New York: Da Capo Press, 1992.
 ■ Maddox, Robert James. Weapons for Victory: The Hiroshima Decision Fifty Years Later. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1995.
 ■ Manchester, William. American Caesar: Douglas MacArthur, 1880-1964. Boston: Little, Brown, 1978.
 ■ McNalty, Bernard D. War in the Pacific: Pearl Harbor to Tokyo Bay. New York: Mayflower, 1978.
 ■ Murray, Williamson, and Allan R. Millett. A War to Be Won: Fighting the Second World War, 1937-1945. Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2000.
 ■ Perret, Geoffrey. Old Soldiers Never Die: The Life of Douglas MacArthur. New York: Random House, 1996
 ■ ———. There’s a War to Be Won: The United States Army in World War II. New York: Random House, 1991.
 ■ Pogue, Forrest. George C. Marshall. 4 vols. New York: Viking Press, 1963-1987.
 ■ Potter, Elmer B. Nimitz. Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 1976.
 ■ Prangee, Gordon William, with Donald M. Goldstein and Katherine V. Dillon.
 ■ Pearl Harbor: The Verdict of History. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1986.
 ■ Rauch, Basil. Roosevelt, from Munich to Pearl Harbor: A Study in the Creation of a Foreign Policy. New York: Creative Age Press, 1950.
 ■ Reynolds, David. Rich Relations: The American Occupation of Britain, 1942-1945. New York: Random House, 1995.
 ■ Rose, Kenneth D. Myth and the Greatest Generation: A Social History of Americans in World War II. New York and London: Routledge, 2008.
 ■ Schaffer, Ronald. Wings of Judgment: American Bombing in World War II. New York: Oxford University Press, 1985.
 ■ Schaller, Michael. Douglas MacArthur: The Far Eastern General. New York: Oxford University Press, 1989.
 ■ Sherwin, Martin. A World Destroyed: The Atomic Bomb and the Grand Alliance. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1975.
 ■ Spector, Ronald H. Eagle against the Sun: The American War with Japan. New York: Free Press, 1985.
 ■ Stoler, Mark A. Allies in War: Britain and America against the Axis Powers, 1940-1945. London: Hodder Arnold, 2005.
 ■ Tansill, Charles C. Back Door to War: The Roosevelt Foreign Policy, 1933-1941. Chicago: Henry Regnery, 1952.
 ■ Toland, John. Infamy: Pearl Harbor and Its Aftermath. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1982.
 ■ Utley, Jonathan G. Going to War with Japan, 1937-1941. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1985.
 ■ Van der Vat, Dan. The Pacific Campaign, World War II: The U.S.-Japanese Naval War, 1941-1945. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1991.
 ■ Weigley, Russell F. The American Way of War: A History of United States Military Strategy and Policy. New York: Macmillan, 1973.
 ■ ———. Eisenhower’s Lieutenants: The Campaign of France and Germany, 1944-1945. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1981.
 ■ Whiting, Charles. Bradley. New York: Ballantine Books, 1971
 ■ Wohlstetter, Roberta. Pearl Harbor: Warning and Decision. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1962.
 ■ Wright, Derrick. Battle for Iwo Jima, 1945. New York: Sutton Publishing, 2000.
   IX. WORLD WAR II AT HOME
 ■ Bennett, Michael J. When Dreams Came True: The GI Bill and the Making of Modern America. Washington, D.C.: Brassey’s, 1996.
 ■ Bérubé, Allan. Coming Out under Fire: The History of Gay Men and Women in World War II. New York: Free Press, 1990.
 ■ Blum, John Morton. V Was for Victory: Politics and American Culture during World War II. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1976.
 ■ Clive, Alan. State of War: Michigan in World War II. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1979.
 ■ Ehrenberg, Lewis A., and Susan E. Hirsch, eds. The War in American Culture: Society and Consciousness during World War II. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1976.
 ■ Goodwin, Doris Kearns. No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1994.
 ■ Harris, Mark J., Franklin D. Mitchell, and Steven J. Schechter, eds. The Home Front: America during World War II. New York: G. P. Putnam, 1984.
 ■ Jeffries, John W. Wartime America: The World War II Home Front. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1996.
 ■ Johnson, Marilynn S. The Second Gold Rush: Oakland and the East Bay in World War II. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993.
 ■ Koistinen, Paul A. C. Arsenal of World War II: The Political Economy of American Warfare, 1940-1945. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2004.
 ■ Lingeman, Richard R. Don’t You Know There’s a War On? The American Home Front, 1941-1945. New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1970.
 ■ McMillen, Neil R., ed. Remaking Dixie: The Impact of World War II on the American South. Jackson: University of Mississippi Press, 1997.
 ■ Mettler, Suzanne. Soldiers to Citizens: The G.I. Bill and the Making of the Greatest Generation. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.
 ■ Norrell, Robert J. Dixie’s War: The South and World War II. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1992.
 ■ O’Neill, William L. A Democracy at War: America’s Fight at Home and Abroad in World War II. New York: Free Press, 1993.
 ■ Perrett, Geoffrey. Days of Sadness, Years of Triumph: The American People, 1939-1945. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1973.
 ■ Polenberg, Richard D. War and Society: The United States, 1941-1945. Philadelphia and New York: J. B. Lippincott & Co., 1972.
 ■ Reynolds, Clark G. America at War, 1941-1945: The Home Front. New York: Random House, 1995.
 ■ Ross, Davis R. B. Preparing for Ulysses: Politics and Veterans during World War II. New York: Columbia University Press, 1969.
 ■ Sparrow, Bartholomew H. From the Outside In: World War II and the American State. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1996.
 ■ Terkel, Studs. “The Good War”: An Oral History of World War Two. New York: Pantheon Books, 1984.
 ■ Winkler, Alan M. Home Front, U.S.A.: America during World War II. Arlington Heights, Ill.: Harlan Davidson, 2000.
 ■ ———. The Politics of Propaganda: The Office of War Information, 1942-1945. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1978.
   X. HARRY S. TRUMAN, THE FAIR DEAL, AND MCCARTHYISM
 ■ Bayley, Edwin R. Joe McCarthy and the Press. New York: Pantheon Books, 1982.
 ■ Belknap, Michael R. Cold War Political Justice: The Smith Act, the Communist Party, and American Civil Liberties. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1977.
 ■ Bennett, David H. The Party of Fear: From Nativist Movements to the New Right in American History. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1988.
 ■ Bentley, Eric, ed. Thirty Years of Treason: Excerpts from Hearings before the House Committee on Un-American Activities, 1938-1968. New York: Viking Press, 1971.
 ■ Berman, William C. The Politics of Civil Rights in the Truman Administration. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1970.
 ■ Carleton, Don E. Red Scare: Right-Wing Hysteria, Fifties Fanaticisms, and Their Legacy in Texas. Austin: Texas Monthly Press, 1985.
 ■ Caute, David. The Great Fear: The Anti-Communist Purge under Truman and Eisenhower. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1978.
 ■ Ceplair, Larry, and Stephen Englund. The Inquisition in Hollywood. Garden City, N.Y.: Anchor Books, 1980.
 ■ Chambers, Whittaker. Witness. Chicago: Henry Regnery, 1952.
 ■ Crosby, Donald F. God, Church, and Flag: Senator Joseph R. McCarthy and the Catholic Church, 1950-1957. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1978.
 ■ Davis, David Brion. The Fear of Conspiracy. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1971.
 ■ Donaldson, Gary A. Truman Defeats Dewey. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1999.
 ■ Donovan, Robert J. Conflict and Crisis: The Presidency of Harry S. Truman, 1945-1948. New York: Norton, 1977.
 ■ ———.Tumultuous Years: The Presidency of Harry S. Truman. New York: Norton, 1982.
 ■ Fariello, Griffin. Red Scare: Memories of the American Inquisition, an Oral History. New York: Avon Books, 1995.
 ■ Faulk, John Henry. Fear on Trial. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1964.
 ■ Ferrell, Robert H. Harry S. Truman: A Life. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1994.
 ■ ———. Harry S. Truman and the Modern Presidency. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1983.
 ■ ———. Truman and Pendergast. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1999.
 ■ ———, ed. The Autobiography of Harry S. Truman. Boulder, Colo.: Associated University Presses, 1980.
 ■ Freeland, Richard M. The Truman Doctrine and the Origins of McCarthyism. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1972.
 ■ Fried, Albert. McCarthyism, the Great American Red Scare: A Documentary History. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.
 ■ Fried, Richard M. Men against McCarthy. New York: Columbia University Press, 1976.
 ■ ———. Nightmare in Red: The McCarthy Era in Perspective. New York: Oxford University Press, 1990.
 ■ Goldstein, Robert J. Political Repression in Modern America. Cambridge, Mass.: Schenkman Books, 1978.
 ■ Goodman, Walter. The Committee: The Extraordinary Career of the House Committee on Un-American Activities. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1968.
 ■ Griffith, Robert. The Politics of Fear: Joseph R. McCarthy and the Senate. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1987.
 ■ Griffith, Robert, and Athan Theoharis, eds. The Specter: Original Essays on the Cold War and the Origins of McCarthyism. New York: Franklin Watts, 1974.
 ■ Guttmann, Allen, and Benjamin Munn Ziegler, eds. Communism, the Courts, and the Constitution. Lexington, Mass.: D. C. Heath, 1964.
 ■ Hamby, Alonzo L. Beyond the New Deal: Harry S. Truman and American Liberalism. New York: Columbia University Press, 1973.
 ■ ———. A Man of the People: A Life of Harry S. Truman. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.
 ■ Hartmann, Susan E. Truman and the 80th Congress. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1971.
 ■ Heale, Michael J. American Anticommunism: Combatting the Enemy Within, 1830-1970. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1990.
 ■ Heller, Francis H., ed. Economics and the Truman Administration. Lawrence: Kansas University Press, 1981
 ■ ———. The Truman White House: The Administration of the Presidency, 1945-1953. Lawrence: Kansas University Press, 1980.
 ■ Hofstadter, Richard. Anti-Intellectualism in American Life. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1970.
 ■ ———. The Paranoid Style in American Politics and Other Essays. New York: Vintage Books, 1965.
 ■ Holmes, David. Stalking the Academic Communist. Hanover, N.H.: University Press of New England, 1989.
 ■ Hoover, J. Edgar. Masters of Deceit: The Story of Communism in America and How to Fight It. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1958.
 ■ Howe, Irving, and Lewis A. Coser. The American Communist Party: A Critical History. Boston: Beacon Press, 1957.
 ■ Jeffreys-Jones, Rhodri. The FBI: A History. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2007.
 ■ Kutler, Stanley I. The American Inquisition: Justice and Injustice in the Cold War. New York: Hill & Wang, 1982.
 ■ Lacey, M. J., ed. The Truman Presidency. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989.
 ■ Martin, John Bartlow. Adlai Stevenson and the World: The Life of Adlai E. Stevenson. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1976.
 ■ Matusow, Allen J., ed. Joseph R. McCarthy. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1970.
 ■ McCoy, Donald R. The Presidency of Harry S. Truman. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1984.
 ■ McCullough, David. Truman. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1992.
 ■ McKeever, Porter. Adlai Stevenson. New York: William Morrow, 1988.
 ■ Miles, Michael. The Odyssey of the American Right. New York: Oxford University Press, 1980.
 ■ Miller, Merle. Plain Speaking: An Oral Biography of Harry S. Truman. New York: Berkley Publishing, 1973.
 ■ Muller, Herbert J. Adlai Stevenson: A Study in Values. New York: Harper & Row, 1967.
 ■ O’Reilly, Kenneth. Hoover and the Un-Americans. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1988.
 ■ Oshinsky, David M. A Conspiracy So Immense: The World of Joe McCarthy. New York: Free Press, 1983.
 ■ Pemberton, William E. Harry S. Truman: Fair Dealer and Cold Warrior. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1989.
 ■ Pessen, Edward. Losing Our Souls: The American Experience in the Cold War. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1993.
 ■ Phillips, Cabell. The Truman Presidency: The History of a Triumphant Succession. New York: Macmillan, 1966.
 ■ Powers, Richard Gid. Secrecy and Power: The Life of J. Edgar Hoover. New York: Free Press, 1987.
 ■ Radosh, Ronald, and Joyce Milton. The Rosenberg File: A Search for the Truth. New York: Vintage Books, 1984.
 ■ Reeves, Thomas C. The Life and Times of Joe McCarthy: A Biography. New York: Stein & Day, 1982.
 ■ Rogin, Michael P. McCarthy and the Intellectuals: The Radical Specter. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1967.
 ■ Rovere, Richard H. Senator Joe McCarthy. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1959.
 ■ Schlesinger, Arthur M. Jr. The Vital Center: The Politics of Freedom. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1949.
 ■ Schrecker, Ellen W. The Age of McCarthyism: A Brief History with Documents. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1994.
 ■ ———. No Ivory Tower: McCarthyism and the Universities. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.
 ■ Selcraig, James Truett. The Red Scare in the Middle West, 1945-1951. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1982.
 ■ Shils, Edward A. The Torment of Secrecy: The Background and Consequences of American Security Policies. New York: Free Press, 1956.
 ■ Smith, Richard Norton. Thomas E. Dewey and His Times. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1982.
 ■ Steel, Ronald. Walter Lippmann and the American Century. Boston: Little, Brown, 1980.
 ■ Steinberg, Peter L. The Great “Red Menace”: United States Prosecution of American Communists, 1947-1952. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1984.
 ■ Stern, Philip M. The Oppenheimer Case: Security on Trial. New York: Harper & Row, 1969.
 ■ Stone, I. F. The Truman Era. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1953.
 ■ Theoharis, Athan G. Seeds of Repression: Harry S. Truman and the Origins of McCarthyism. New York: Times Books, 1971.
 ■ Theoharis, Athan G., and John Stuart Cox. The Boss: J. Edgar Hoover and the Great American Inquisition. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1988.
 ■ Truman, Harry S. Memoirs. 2 vols. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1955, 1956.
 ■ ———. Mr. Citizen. New York: Bernard Geis Associates, 1960.
 ■ Truman, Margaret. Bess W. Truman. New York: Macmillan, 1986.
 ■ ———. Harry S. Truman. New York: William Morrow & Co., 1973.
 ■ Wechsler, James A. The Age of Suspicion. New York: Random House, 1953.
 ■ Weinstein, Allen. Perjury: The Hiss-Chambers Case. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1978.
   XI. POSTWAR FOREIGN RELATIONS, THE COLD WAR, AND KOREA
 ■ Acheson, Dean. Present at the Creation: My Years in the State Department. New York: Norton, 1969.
 ■ Anderson, Terry H. The United States, Great Britain, and the Cold War, 1944-1947. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1981.
 ■ Boyle, Peter G. American-Soviet Relations: From the Russian Revolution to the Fall of Communism. London: Routledge, 1994.
 ■ Kaufman, Burton I. The Korean War: Challenges in Crisis, Credibility, and Command. 2nd ed. New York : McGraw-Hill, 1997.
 ■ Cha, Victor D. Alignment Despite Antagonism: The United States-Korea-Japan Security Triangle. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1999.
 ■ Clemens, Diane Shaver. Yalta. New York: Oxford University Press, 1970.
 ■ Crockatt, Richard. The Fifty Years War: The United States and the Soviet Union in World Politics, 1941-1991. New York: Routledge, 1995.
 ■ Cumings, Bruce. The Origins of the Korean War. 2 vols. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1981, 1990.
 ■ Dilloway, James. From Cold War to Chaos? Reviving Humane Development or Remaking Market Man. Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 1999.
 ■ Evangelista, Matthew. Unarmed Forces: The Transnational Movement to End the Cold War. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1999.
 ■ Feis, Herbert. From Trust to Terror: The Onset of the Cold War. New York: Norton, 1970.
 ■ Fisher, Benjamin F., ed. At Cold War’s End: U.S. Intelligence on the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, 1989-1991. Reston, Va.: Central Intelligence Agency, 1999.
 ■ Foot, Dorothy. The Wrong War: American Policy and the Dimensions of the Korean Conflict, 1950-1953. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1985.
 ■ Friedman, Norman. The Fifty-Year War: Conflict and Strategy in the Cold War. Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 2000.
 ■ Gaddis, John Lewis. The Cold War: A New History. New York: Penguin Press, 2005.
 ■ ———. Long Peace: Inquiries into the History of the Cold War. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987.
 ■ ———. Russia, the Soviet Union, and the United States: An Interpretative History. 2nd ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1990.
 ■ ———. Strategies of Containment: A Critical Appraisal of Postwar American National Security Policy. New York: Oxford University Press, 1982.
 ■ ———. We Now Know: Rethinking Cold War History. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.
 ■ ———, ed. Cold War Statesmen Confront the Bomb: Nuclear Diplomacy since 1945. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
 ■ Gardner, Lloyd. Architects of Illusion. New York: Random House, 1968.
 ■ Gillon, Steven M. Politics and Vision: The ADA and American Liberalism, 1947-1985. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987.
 ■ Harbutt, Fraser J. The Iron Curtain: Churchill, America, and the Origins of the Cold War. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986.
 ■ Hastings, Max. The Korean War. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1987.
 ■ Heller, Francis E. The Korean War: A Twenty-Five-Year Perspective. Lawrence: Kansas University Press, 1977.
 ■ Hogan, Michael. The Marshall Plan. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987.
 ■ Isaacson, Walter, and Evan Thomas. The Wise Men: Six Friends and the World They Made: Acheson, Bohlen, Harriman, Kennan, Lovett, and McCloy. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1986.
 ■ Jenkins, Philip. The Cold War at Home: The Red Scare in Pennsylvania, 1945-1960. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1999.
 ■ Jian, Chen. China’s Road to the Korean War: The Making of the Sino-American Confrontation. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004.
 ■ Johnson, Robert David. Congress and the Cold War. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005.
 ■ Karabell, Zachary. Architects of Intervention: The United States, the Third World, and the Cold War, 1946-1962. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1999.
 ■ Kennan, George F. Memoirs, 1925-1950. Boston: Little, Brown, 1967.
 ■ Kirkendall, Richard S. Harry S. Truman, Korea, and the Imperial Presidency. St. Charles, Miss.: Forum Press, 1975.
 ■ Kramer, Hilton. The Twilight of the Intellectuals: Culture and Politics in the Era of the Cold War. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1999.
 ■ LaFeber, Walter. America, Russia, and the Cold War, 1945-1992. 8th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1997.
 ■ Lee, Steven Hugh. The Korean War. Harlow, England: Pearson Education, 2001.
 ■ Leffler, Melvyn. A Preponderance of Power: National Security, the Truman Administration, and the Cold War. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1992.
 ■ Levering, Ralph, Vladamir Pechatnov, Verena Botzenhart-Viehe, and C. Earl
 ■ Edmondson. Debating the Origins of the Cold War. Baltimore, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2001.
 ■ Lucas, Scott. Freedom’s War: The American Crusade against the Soviet Union. New York: New York University Press, 1999.
 ■ MacQueen, Norrie. The United Nations since 1945: Peacekeeping and the Cold War. New York: Addison Wesley Longman, 1999.
 ■ McNeill, William H. America, Britain, and Russia: Their Co-operation and Conflict, 1941-1946. New York: Oxford University Press, 1953.
 ■ Millett, Allan R. The War for Korea, 1945-1950: A House Burning. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2005.
 ■ Miscamble, Wilson D. From Roosevelt to Truman: Potsdam, Hiroshima, and the Cold War. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.
 ■ Mitrovich, Gregory. Undermining the Kremlin: America’s Strategy to Subvert the Soviet Bloc, 1947-1956. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2000.
 ■ Nagai, Yonosuke, and Akira Iriye, eds. The Origins of the Cold War in Asia. New York: Columbia University Press, 1977.
 ■ Ninkovich, Frank. The Diplomacy of Ideas: U.S. Foreign Policy and Cultural Relations, 1938-1950. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1980.
 ■ ———. Germany and the United States: The Transformation of the German Question since 1945. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1988.
 ■ Nolan, Janne E. An Elusive Consensus: Nuclear Weapons and American Security after the Cold War. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution Press, 1999.
 ■ Painter, David S., and Melvyn Leffler, eds. The Origins of the Cold War: An International History. London: Routledge, 2005.
 ■ Paterson, Thomas G. On Every Front: The Making and Unmaking of the Cold War. New York: W. W. Norton, 1992.
 ■ Paterson, Thomas G., and Robert J. McMahon, eds. The Origins of the Cold War. Lexington, Ky.: Heath, 1991.
 ■ Pierpaoli, Paul G. Jr. Truman and Korea: The Political Culture of the Early Cold War. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1999.
 ■ Powaski, Ronald E. The Cold War: The United States and the Soviet Union, 1917-1991. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.
 ■ Prevots, Naima. Dance for Export: Cultural Diplomacy and the Cold War. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 1998.
 ■ Roberts, Geoffrey K. The Soviet Union in World Politics: Coexistence, Revolution, and Cold War, 1945-1991. New York: Routledge, 1999.
 ■ Schaller, Michael. The American Occupation of Japan: The Origins of the Cold War in Asia. New York: Oxford University Press, 1985.
 ■ Schonberger, Howard B. Aftermath of War: Americans and the Remaking of Japan, 1945-1952. Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press, 1989.
 ■ Sibley, Katherine A. S. The Cold War. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1998.
 ■ Smith, Bradley F. The Shadow Warriors: O.S.S. and the Origins of the C.I.A. New York: Basic Books, 1983.
 ■ Smith, Joseph. The Cold War, 1945-1991. Oxford: Blackwell, 1998.
 ■ Snetsinger, John. Truman, the Jewish Vote, and the Creation of Israel. Stanford, Calif.: Hoover Institution, 1974.
 ■ Spanier, John W. The Truman-MacArthur Controversy and the Korean War. Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press, 1959.
 ■ Trachtenberg, Marc. A Constructed Peace: The Making of the European Settlement, 1945-1963. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1999.
 ■ Troy, Thomas F. Donovan and the CIA: A History of the Establishment of the Central Intelligence Agency. Frederick, Md.: University Publications of America, 1981.
 ■ Ulam, Adam B. Expansion and Coexistence: Soviet Foreign Policy, 1917-1973. New York: Praeger, 1988.
 ■ Westad, Odd Arne. Cold War and Revolution: Soviet-American Rivalry and the Origins of the Chinese Civil War, 1944-1946. New York: Columbia University Press, 1993.
 ■ Westad, Odd Arne, ed. Reviewing the Cold War: Approaches, Interpretations, Theory. London: Frank Cass, 2000.
 ■ Williams, William Appleman. The Tragedy of American Diplomacy. New York: Dell, 1972.
 ■ Yergin, Daniel. Shattered Peace: The Origins of the Cold War and the National Security State. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1977.
   XII. AFRICAN AMERICANS
 ■ Anderson, Jervis. A. Philip Randolph: A Biographical Portrait. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1973.
 ■ Ball, Howard. A Defiant Life: Thurgood Marshall and the Persistence of Racism in America. New York: Crown, 1998.
 ■ Bates, Beth Tompkins. Pullman Porters and the Rise of Protest Politics in Black America, 1925-1945. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2001.
 ■ Berg, Manfred. “Ticket to Freedom”: The NAACP and the Struggle for Black Political Integration. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2005.
 ■ Berman, William C. The Politics of Civil Rights in the Truman Administration. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1970.
 ■ Borstelmann, Thomas. The Cold War and the Color Line: American Race Relations in the Global Arena. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2001.
 ■ Brandt, Nat. Harlem at War: The Black Experience in World War II. Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press, 1996.
 ■ Buchanan, A. Russell. Black Americans in World War II. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Clio Books, 1977.
 ■ Buckley, Gail L. American Patriots: The Story of Blacks in the Military from the Revolution to Desert Storm. New York: Random House, 2001.
 ■ Bunche, Ralph. The Political Status of the Negro in the Age of FDR. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1973.
 ■ Cole, Olen. The African-American Experience in the Civilian Conservation Corps. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1999.
 ■ Dalfiume, Richard M. Fighting on Two Fronts: Desegregation of the U.S. Armed Forces, 1939-1953. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1969.
 ■ Dudziak, Mary L. Cold War Civil Rights: Race and the Image of American Democracy. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2000.
 ■ Egerton, John. Speak Now against the Day: The Generation before the Civil Rights Movement in the South. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1994.
 ■ Fairclough, Adam. Race and Democracy: The Civil Rights Struggle in Louisiana, 1915-1972. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1995.
 ■ Gardner, Michael R. Harry Truman and Civil Rights: Moral Courage and Political Risks. Carbondale, Ill.: Southern Illinois University Press, 2002.
 ■ Greenberg, Cheryl Lynn. “Or Does It Explode?”: Black Harlem in the Great Depression. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991.
 ■ Hall, Jacquelyn Dowd. Revolt against Chivalry: Jessie Daniel Ames and the Women’s Campaign against Lynching. New York: Columbia University Press, 1979.
 ■ Hill, Robert A., ed. The FBI’s RACON: Racial Conditions in the United States during World War II. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1995.
 ■ Honey, Maureen, ed. Bitter Fruit: African American Women during World War II. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1999.
 ■ Janken, Kenneth Robert. White: The Biography of Walter White, Mr. NAACP. New York: New Press, 2003.
 ■ Jonas, Gilbert. Freedom’s Sword: The NAACP and the Struggle against Racism in America, 1909-1969. New York and London: Routledge, 2007.
 ■ Kelley, Robin D. G. Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists during the Great Depression. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1990.
 ■ Kirby, John B. Black Americans in the Roosevelt Era: Liberalism and Race. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1980.
 ■ Klinkner, Philip A., with Rogers M. Smith. The Unsteady March: The Rise and Decline of Racial Equality in America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999.
 ■ Kryder, Daniel. Divided Arsenal: Race and the American State during World War II. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
 ■ Lee, Ulysses G. The Employment of Negro Troops. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1966.
 ■ McRae, Donald. In Black and White: The Untold Story of Joe Louis and Jesse Owens. London: Scribner, 2003.
 ■ Meier, August, and Elliott Rudwick. CORE: A Study in the Civil Rights Movement, 1942-1968. New York: Oxford University Press, 1973.
 ■ Moore, Christopher P. Fighting for America: Black Soldiers, the Unsung Heroes of World War II. New York: One World, 2004.
 ■ Morris, Aldon D. The Origins of the Civil Rights Movement: Black Communities Organizing for Change. New York: Free Press, 1984.
 ■ Motley, Mary Penick, ed. The Invisible Soldier: The Experience of the Black Soldier in World War II. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1975.
 ■ Myrdal, Gunnar. An American Dilemma: The Negro Problem and Modern Democracy. New York: Harper, 1944.
 ■ Naison, Mark. Communists in Harlem during the Depression. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1983.
 ■ Nalty, Bernard C. Strength for the Fight: A History of Black Americans in the Military. New York and London: Free Press, 1986.
 ■ Norrell, Robert J. The House I Live In: Race in the American Century. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.
 ■ Pfeffer, Paula P. A. Philip Randolph, Pioneer of the Civil Rights Movement. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1990.
 ■ Plummer, Brenda Gayle. Rising Wind: Black Americans and U.S Foreign Affairs, 1935-1960. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1995.
 ■ Putney, Martha S. When the Nation Was in Need: Blacks in the Women’s Army Corps during World War II. Metuchen, N.H.: Scarecrow Press, 1992.
 ■ Record, Wilson. Race and Radicalism: The NAACP and the Communist Party in Conflict. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1964.
 ■ Reed, Merl E. Seedtime for the Modern Civil Rights Movement: The President’s Committee on Fair Employment Practice, 1941-1946. Baton Rouge: University of Louisiana Press, 1991.
 ■ Sandler, Stanley. Segregated Skies: All-Black Combat Squadrons of WWII. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1992.
 ■ Scott, Lawrence P., and William M. Womack, Sr. Double V: The Civil Rights Struggle of the Tuskegee Airmen. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 1994
 ■ Sitkoff, Harvard. A New Deal for Blacks: The Emergence of Civil Rights as a National Issue, Volume I: The Depression Decade. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978.
 ■ Smith, Graham. When Jim Crow Met John Bull: Black American Soldiers in World War II Britain. London: Tauris, 1987.
 ■ Sosna, Morton. In Search of the Silent South: Southern Liberals and the Race Issue. New York: Columbia University Press, 1977.
 ■ Sternsher, Bernard, ed. The Negro in Depression and War: Prelude to Revolution, 1930-1945. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1969.
 ■ Sugrue, Thomas J. The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1996.
 ■ Sullivan, Patricia. Days of Hope: Race and Democracy in the New Deal Era. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996.
 ■ Tushnet, Mark V. The NAACP’s Legal Strategy against Segregated Education, 1925-1950. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1987.
 ■ Weiss, Nancy J. Farewell to the Party of Lincoln: Black Politics in the Age of FDR. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1983.
 ■ White, Walter. A Man Called White: The Autobiography of Walter White. London: Victor Gollancz, 1949.
 ■ Wolters, Raymond. Negroes and the Great Depression: The Problem of Economic Recovery. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Publishing, 1970.
 ■ Wynn, Neil A. The Afro-American and the Second World War. New York: Holmes & Meier, 1993.
 ■ Zangrando, Robert L. The NAACP Crusade against Lynching, 1909-1950. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1980.
   XIII. JAPANESE AMERICANS, HISPANICS, AND OTHER MINORITIES
 ■ Acu a, Rodolfo. Occupied America: A History of Chicanos. New York: Harper & Row, 2000.
 ■ Bernstein, Alison R. American Indians and World War II: Toward a New Era in Indian Affairs. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1991.
 ■ Bérubé, Allan. Coming Out under Fire: The History of Gay Men and Women in World War II. New York: Free Press, 1990.
 ■ Bixler, Margaret T. Winds of Freedom: The Story of the Navajo Code Talkers of World War II. Darien, Conn.: Two Bytes Publishing, 1992.
 ■ Collier, John. Indians of the Americas. New York: Signet, 1947.
 ■ Daniels, Roger. Concentration Camps USA: Japanese Americans and World War II. Malabar, Fla.: Krieger, 1993.
 ■ Daniels, Roger, Sandra C. Taylor, and Harry H. L. Kitano, eds. Japanese Americans, from Relocation to Redress. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1991.
 ■ Franco, Jere Bishop. Crossing the Pond: The Native American Effort in World War II. Denton: University of North Texas Press, 1999.
 ■ Galarza, Ernesto. Barrio Boy. South Bend, Ind.: Notre Dame University Press, 1971.
 ■ ———. Farm Workers and Agri-Business in California, 1947-1960. South Bend, Ind.: Notre Dame University Press, 1977.
 ■ ———. Merchants of Labor: The Mexican Bracero Story. Santa Barbara, Calif.: McNally-Loftin, 1964.
 ■ Gamboa, Erasmo. Mexican Labor and World War II: Braceros in the Pacific Northwest, 1942-1947. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1990.
 ■ Gann, L. H., and Peter J. Duigan. The Hispanics in the United States: A History. Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1986.
 ■ García, Mario T. Mexican-Americans: Leadership, Ideology, and Identity, 1930-1960. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1989.
 ■ Girdner, Audrie. The Great Betrayal: The Evacuation of the Japanese-Americans during World War II. New York: Macmillan, 1969.
 ■ Hauptman, Laurence M. The Iroquois and the New Deal. Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press, 1981.
 ■ Hayashi, Brian Masaru. Democratizing the Enemy: The Japanese American Internment. Princeton, N.Y.: Princeton University Press, 2004.
 ■ Hoffman, Abraham. Unwanted Mexican Americans: Repatriation Pressures during the Great Depression. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1973.
 ■ Irons, Peter H. Justice at War: The Story of the Japanese-American Internment Cases. New York: Oxford University Press, 1983.
 ■ ———, ed. Justice Delayed: The Record of the Japanese American Internment Cases. Middleton, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 1989
 ■ Kawano, Kenji. Warriors: Navajo Code Talkers. Flagstaff, Ariz.: Northland Publishing, 1990.
 ■ Kitanto, Harry H. L., and Roger Daniels. Asian Americans: Emerging Minorities. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 2001.
 ■ Meier, Matt S., and Feliciano Rivera. The Chicanos: A History of Mexican Americans. New York: Hill & Wang, 1972.
 ■ Moore, Joan W., and Harry Pachon. Hispanics in the United States. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1985.
 ■ Myer, Dillon S. Uprooted Americans: The Japanese Americans and the War Relocation Authority during World War II. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1971.
 ■ Okihiro, Gary Y. Whispered Silences: Japanese Americans and World War II. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1996.
 ■ Parman, Donald I. The Navajos and the New Deal. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1976.
 ■ Philip, Kenneth R. John Collier’s Crusade for Indian Reform, 1920-1954. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1977.
 ■ Reisler, Mark. By the Sweat of Their Brow: Mexican Immigrant Labor in the United States, 1900-1940. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1976.
 ■ Rivas-Rodriguez, Maggie, ed. Mexican Americans and World War II. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2005.
 ■ Robinson, Greg. By Order of the President: FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2001.
 ■ Sanchez, George J. Becoming Mexican-American: Ethnicity, Culture, and Identity in Chicano Los Angeles, 1900-1945. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.
 ■ Servin, Manuel, ed. The Mexican Americans: An Awakening Minority. Beverly Hills, Calif.: Glencoe Press, 1970.
 ■ Taylor, Graham D. The New Deal and American Indian Tribalism: The Administration of the Indian Reorganization Act, 1934-1945. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1980.
 ■ Weglyn, Michi N. Years of Infamy: The Untold story of America’s Concentration Camps. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1976.
 ■ Yoo, David. Growing up Nisei: Race, Generation, and Culture among Japanese Americans of California, 1924-1949. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2000.
   XIV. LABOR MOVEMENTS
 ■ Atleson, James B. Labor and the Wartime State: Labor Relations and Law during World War II. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998.
 ■ Auerbacj, Jerold S. Labor and Liberty: The La Follette Committee and the New Deal. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1966.
 ■ Barnard, John. Walter Reuther and the Rise of the Auto Workers. Boston: Little, Brown, 1983.
 ■ Bernstein, Irving. A Caring Society: The New Deal, the Worker, and the Great Depression. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1985.
 ■ ———. The Turbulent Years: A History of the American Worker, 1933-1941. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1969.
 ■ Brody, David. Workers in Industrial America: Essays on the 20th-Century Struggle. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.
 ■ Cherny, Robert W., William Issel, and Kieran Walsh Taylor, eds. American Labor and the Cold War: Grassroots Politics and Postwar Popular Culture. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 2004.
 ■ Cochran, Bert. Labor and Communism: The Conflict That Shaped American Unions. Princeton, N.J: Princeton University Press, 1977.
 ■ Cohen, Lizbeth. Making a New Deal: Industrial Workers in Chicago, 1919-1939. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990.
 ■ Dubofsky, Melvyn, and John Van Tine. John L. Lewis: A Biography. New York: Quadrangle, 1977.
 ■ Fones-Wolf, Elizabeth A. Selling Free Enterprise: The Business Assault on Labor and Liberalism, 1945-1960. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994.
 ■ Freeman, Joshua B. Working-Class New York: Life and Labor since World War
   II. New York: New Press, 2000.
 ■ Gordon, Colin. New Deals: Business, Labor, and Politics in America, 1920-1935. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994.
 ■ Harris, Howell John. The Right to Manage: Industrial Relations Policies of American Business in the 1940s. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1982.
 ■ Kersten, Andrew E. Labor’s Homefront: The American Federation of Labor during World War II. New York: New York University Press, 2006.
 ■ Levenstein, Harvey A. Communism, Anti-Communism, and the CIO. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1981.
 ■ Lichtenstein, Nelson N. Labor’s War at Home: The CIO in World War II. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982.
 ■ ———. The Most Dangerous Man in Detroit: Walter Reuther and the Fate of American Labor. New York: Basic Books, 1995.
 ■ Lipsitz, George. A Rainbow at Midnight: Labor and Culture in the 1940s. Champaign: University of Illinois Press, 1994.
 ■ McClure, Arthur F. The Truman Administration and Problems of Postwar Labor, 1945-1948. Rutherford, N.J.: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1969.
 ■ Montgomery, David. Workers Control in America: Studies in the History of
 ■ Work, Technology, and Labor Struggles. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1979.
 ■ Nelson, Bruce. Divided We Stand: American Workers and the Struggle for Black Equality. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2001.
 ■ Schatz, Ronald W. The Electrical Workers: A History of Labor at General Electric and Westinghouse, 1923-1960. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1983.
 ■ Vittoz, Stanley. New Deal Labor Policy and the American Industrial Economy. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1987.
 ■ Zieger, Robert H. American Workers, American Unions, 1920-1945. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1985.
 ■ ———. The CIO, 1935-1955. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1995.
   XV. WOMEN
 ■ Anderson, Karen. Wartime Women: Sex Roles, Family Relations, and the Status of Women During World War II. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1981.
 ■ Blackwelder, Julia Kirk. Women of the Depression: Caste and Culture in San Antonio, 1929-1939. Austin: Texas A&M University Press, 1998.
 ■ Campbell, D’Ann. Women at War with America: Private Lives in a Patriotic Age. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1984.
 ■ Chafe, William H. The Paradox of Change: American Women in the 20th Century. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991.
 ■ Degler, Carl N. At Odds: Women and the Family in America from the Revolution to the Present. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1980.
 ■ Friedan, Betty. The Feminine Mystique. New York: W. W. Norton, 1963.
 ■ Gluck, Sherna Berger. Rosie the Riveter Revisited: Women, the War, and Social Change. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1981.
 ■ Hartmann, Susan M. The Home Front and Beyond: American Women in the 1940s. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1982.
 ■ Holm, Jeanne M., ed. In Defense of a Nation: Servicewomen in World War II. Arlington, Va.: Vandamere Press, 1998.
 ■ Honey, Maureen. Bitter Fruit: African American Women in World War II. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1999.
 ■ Kaledin, Eugenia. Mothers and More: American Women in the 1950s. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1984.
 ■ Kessler-Harris, Alice. Out to Work: A History of Wage-Earning Women in the United States. New York: Oxford University Press, 1982.
 ■ Merryman, Molly. Clipped Wings: The Rise and Fall of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs) of World War II. New York: New York University Press, 1998.
 ■ Meyer, Leisa D. Creating GI Jane: Sexuality and Power in the Women’s Army Corps during World War II. New York: Columbia University Press, 1996.
 ■ Meyerowitz, Joanne, ed. Not June Cleaver: Women and Gender in Postwar America, 1945-1960. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1994.
 ■ Milkman, Ruth. Gender at Work: The Dynamics of Job Segregation by Sex during World War II. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1987.
 ■ Morden, Bettie J. The Women’s Army Corps, 1945-1978. Washington: Center of Military History, United States Army, 1990.
 ■ Scharf, Lois. To Work and to Wed: Female Employment, Feminism, and the Great Depression. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1980.
 ■ Wandersee, Winifred D. Women’s Work and Family Values, 1920-1940. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1981.
 ■ Ware, Susan. Beyond Suffrage: Women in the New Deal. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1981.
 ■ ———. Holding Their Own: American Women in the 1930s. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1982.
 ■ Yellin, Emily. Our Mother’s War: American Women at Home and at the Front during World War II. New York: Free Press, 2004.
   XVI. SOCIAL CHANGE, CULTURE, SPORT, AND ENTERTAINMENT
 ■ Aaron, Daniel, and Robert Bendiner, eds. The Strenuous Decade: A Social and Intellectual Record of the Nineteen-Thirties. New York: Anchor Books, 1970.
 ■ Aronson, James. The Press and the Cold War. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1970.
 ■ Ashby, Leroy. With Amusement for All: A History of American Popular Culture since 1830. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2006.
 ■ Barnouw, Erik. The Image Empire: A History of Broadcasting in the United States. New York: Oxford University Press, 1970.
 ■ Baskerville, Stephen, and Ralph Willett, eds. Nothing Else to Fear: New Perspectives on America in the Thirties. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1985.
 ■ Baughman, James. The Republic of Mass Culture: Journalism, Filmmaking, and Broadcasting in America since 1941. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997.
 ■ Baxter, John. Hollywood in the Thirties. New York: A. S. Barnes & Co., 1980.
 ■ Bergman, Andrew. We’re in the Money: Depression America and Its Films. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1971.
 ■ Bernhard, Nancy E. U.S. Television News and Cold War Propaganda, 1947-1960. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999.
 ■ Biskind, Peter. Seeing Is Believing: How Hollywood Taught Us to Stop Worrying and Love the Fifties. New York: Pantheon Books, 1983.
 ■ Blue, Howard. Words at War: World War II Era Radio Drama and the Postwar Broadcasting Industry Blacklist. Lanham, Md.: Scarecrow Press, 2002.
 ■ Boyer, Paul S. By the Bomb’s Early Light: American Thought and Culture at the Dawn of the Atomic Age. New York: Pantheon Books, 1985.
 ■ Brands, H. W. The Devil We Knew: Americans and the Cold War. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.
 ■ Braverman, Jordan. To Hasten the Homecoming: How Americans Fought World War II through the Media. Lanham, Md.: Madison Books, 1996.
 ■ Brode, Douglas. The Films of the Fifties: “Sunset Boulevard” to “On the Beach.” Secaucus, N.J.: Citadel Press, 1976.
 ■ Burk, Robert F. Much More Than a Game: Players, Owners, and American Baseball since 1921. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2001.
 ■ Carter, Paul A. Another Part of the Fifties. New York: Columbia University Press, 1983.
 ■ Ceplair, Larry, and Steven Englund. The Inquisition in Hollywood: Politics in the Film Community, 1930-1960. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1980.
 ■ Chambers, John W., and David Culbert, eds. World War II, Film, and History. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.
 ■ Christensen, Terry. Reel Politics: American Political Movies from “Birth of a Nation” to “Platoon.” New York: Blackwell, 1987.
 ■ Clarnand, Elaine, and Steve Goodson, eds. The Impact of the Cold War on American Popular Culture. Carrollton: State University of West Georgia, 1999.
 ■ Cooney, Terry A. Balancing Acts: American Thought and Culture in the 1930s. New York: Twayne Publishers, 1995.
 ■ Corber, Robert J. Homosexuality in Cold War America: Resistance and the Crisis of Masculinity. Durham: Duke University Press, 1997.
 ■ Covert, Catherine L., and John D. Stevens. Mass Media between the Wars: Perceptions of Cultural Tension, 1918-1941. Syracuse, N.Y.: Syracuse University Press, 1984.
 ■ Culbert, David H. News for Everyman: Radio and Foreign Affairs in Thirties America. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1976.
 ■ Cullen, Jim., ed. Popular Culture in American History. Oxford: Blackwell, 2001.
 ■ Davies, R. O. America’s Obsession: Sports and Society since 1945. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1994.
 ■ Denning, Michael. Cultural Front: The Laboring of American Culture in the Twentieth Century. London: Verso 1998.
 ■ Doherty, Thomas. Projections of War: Hollywood, American Culture, and World War II. New York: Columbia University Press, 1993.
 ■ Doss, Erika. Twentieth Century American Art. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002.
 ■ Dowdy, Andrew. The Films of the Fifties: The American State of Mind. New York: Morrow, 1973.
 ■ Engelhardt, Tom. The End of Victory Culture: Cold War America and the Disillusioning of a Generation. New York: Basic Books, 1994.
 ■ Field, Hermann, and Kate Field. Trapped in the Cold War: The Ordeal of an American Family. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1999.
 ■ Foreman, Joel, ed. The Other Fifties: Interrogating Midcentury American Icons. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1997.
 ■ ———, ed. American Culture of the 1950s. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1996.
 ■ Fried, Richard M. The Russians Are Coming! The Russians are Coming!: Pageantry and Patriotism in Cold-War America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.
 ■ Friendly, Fred W. Due to Circumstances beyond Our Control . . . New York: Vintage Books, 1968.
 ■ Gans, Herbert J. The Levittowners: Ways of Life and Politics in a New Suburban Community. New York: Pantheon Books, 1967.
 ■ Gomery, Douglas. Shared Pleasures: A History of Movie Presentations in the United States. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1992.
 ■ Gorn, Elliott, and Warren Goldstein. A Brief History of American Sports. New York: Hill & Wang, 1993.
 ■ Graebner, William S. The Age of Doubt: American Thought and Culture in the 1940s. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1991.
 ■ Guilbaut, Serge. How New York Stole the Idea of Modern Art: Abstract Expressionism, Freedom, and the Cold War. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1983.
 ■ Henriksen, Margot A. Dr. Strangelove’s America: Society and Culture in the Atomic Age. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997.
 ■ Higham, Charles, and Joel Greenberg. Hollywood in the Forties. New York: A. S. Barnes & Co., 1968.
 ■ Hixson, Walter L. Parting the Curtain: Propaganda, Culture, and the Cold War, 1945-1961. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1998.
 ■ Horten, Gerd. Radio Goes to War: The Cultural Politics of Propaganda during World War II. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002.
 ■ Iskstadt, Heinz, Rob Kroes, and Brian Lee, eds. The Thirties: Politics and Culture Times of Broken Dreams. Amsterdam, Netherlands: Free University Press, 1987.
 ■ Jackson, Kenneth T. Crabgrass Frontier: The Suburbanization of America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1985.
 ■ Jones, Landon Y. Great Expectations: America and the Baby Boom Generation. New York: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan, 1980.
 ■ Koppes, Clayton R., and Gregory D. Black. Hollywood Goes to War: How Politics and Propaganda Shaped World War II Movies. New York: Free Press, 1987.
 ■ Krutch, Joseph Wood. The American Drama since 1918: An Informal History. New York: George Braziller, 1957.
 ■ Lebow, Richard Ned. We All Lost the Cold War. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1993.
 ■ Levine, Lawrence W. Unpredictable Past: Explorations in American Cultural History. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.
 ■ Lipsitz, George. Time Passages: Collective Memory and American Popular Culture. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2001.
 ■ Loeb, P. Nuclear Culture: Living and Working in the World’s Largest Atomic Complex. Philadelphia: New Society Publishers, 1986.
 ■ MacDonald, J. Fred. Television and the Red Menace: The Video Road to Vietnam. New York: Praeger, 1985.
 ■ May, Elaine Tyler. Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era. New York: Basic Books, 1988.
 ■ May, Lary. The Big Tomorrow: Hollywood and the Politics of the American Way. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.
 ■ ———, ed. Recasting America: Culture and Politics in the Age of the Cold War. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989.
 ■ Mintz, Steven, and Randy Roberts. Hollywood’s America: United States History through Its Films. St. James, N.Y.: Brandywine Press, 2001.
 ■ Oakley, Ronald R. God’s Country: America in the Fifties. New York: Dembner Books, 1986.
 ■ Pells, Richard. The Liberal Mind in a Conservative Age: American Intellectuals in the 1940s and 1950s. New York: Harper & Row, 1985.
 ■ Persico, Joseph E. Edward R. Murrow: An American Original. New York: Da Capo Press, 1997.
 ■ Roddick, Nick. A New Deal in Entertainment: Warner Brothers in the 1930s. London: British Film Institute, 1983.
 ■ Rose, Barbara. American Painting: The Twentieth Century. New York: Rizzoli Publications, 1986.
 ■ Sayre, Nora. Running Time: Films of the Cold War. New York: Dial Press, 1982.
 ■ Schwartz, Richard Alan. Cold War Culture: Media and the Arts, 1945-1990. New York: Facts on File, 1998.
 ■ Seidel, Michael. Streak: Joe DiMaggio and the Summer of ’41. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1988.
 ■ Shulman, Holly C. The Voice of America: Propaganda and Democracy, 1941-1945. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1990.
 ■ Sklar, Robert. Movie-Made America: A Social History of American Movies. New York: Random House, 1975.
 ■ Solberg, Carl. Rising High: America in the Cold War. New York: Mason & Lipscomb, 1973.
 ■ Sperber, A.M. Murrow: His Life and Times. New York: Freundlich Books, 1986.
 ■ Spigel, Lynn. Make Room for TV: Television and the Family Idea in Postwar America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992.
 ■ Stott, William. Documentary Expression in Thirties America. New York: Oxford University Press, 1973.
 ■ Tygiel, Jules. Baseball’s Great Experiment: Jackie Robinson and His Legacy. New York: Oxford University Press, 1983.
 ■ Tyler May, Elaine. Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era. New York: Basic Books, 1988.
 ■ Weart, Spencer R. Nuclear Fear: A History of Images. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1988.
 ■ Whitfield, Stephen J. The Culture of the Cold War. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991.
 ■ Winkler, Allan M. Life under a Cloud: American Anxiety about the Atom. New York: Oxford University Press, 1993.
 ■ Zolotow, Maurice. Shooting Star: A Biography of John Wayne. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1974.

Historical Dictionary of the Roosevelt–Truman Era . . 2015.

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  • Bibliography — (from Greek gr. βιβλιογραφία, bibliographia , literally book writing ), as a practice, is the academic study of books as physical, cultural objects; in this sense, it is also known as bibliology (from Greek gr. λογία, logia ). On the whole,… …   Wikipedia

  • Bibliography — Bib li*og ra*phy (b[i^]b l[i^]*[o^]g r[.a]*f[y^]) n.; pl. {Bibliographies}. [Gr. bibliografi a: cf. F. bibliographie.] 1. a history or description of books and manuscripts, with notices of the different editions, the times when they were printed …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bibliography — 1670s, the writing of books, from Gk. bibliographia the writing of books, from BIBLIO (Cf. biblio ) + graphos (something) drawn or written. Sense of a list of books that form the literature of a subject is first attested 1869. Related:… …   Etymology dictionary

  • bibliography — ► NOUN (pl. bibliographies) 1) a list of books or documents on a particular subject or by a particular author. 2) the study of books in terms of their classification, printing, and publication. 3) a list of the books referred to in a scholarly… …   English terms dictionary

  • bibliography — [bib΄lē äg′rə fē] n. pl. bibliographies [Gr bibliographia: see BIBLIO & GRAPHY] 1. the study of the editions, dates, authorship, etc. of books and other writings 2. a book containing such information 3. a list of sources of information on a given …   English World dictionary

  • BIBLIOGRAPHY — As in general bibliography, the development of Hebrew bibliography is characterized by the transition from brief listings to more detailed catalogues. The listing of the books of the Bible which appears in the Talmud (BB 14b, 15a) had as its… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • bibliography — bibliographic /bib lee euh graf ik/, bibliographical, adj. bibliographically, adv. /bib lee og reuh fee/, n., pl. bibliographies. 1. a complete or selective list of works compiled upon some common principle, as authorship, subject, place of… …   Universalium

  • Bibliography —    Internet Sites    Dictionaries and Bibliographies of Sacred Music    Biographies of musicians    Bibliography: Byzantine and Orthodox    Discographies    Important collections of music    INTRODUCTION    Because the entri …   Historical dictionary of sacred music

  • Bibliography —  INTRODUCTION  ■ The chief problem in compiling a bibliography on Marxism is the sheer volume of sources. The literature produced by and about Marxists, Marxist organizations, movements and regimes is vast. This abundance of material testifies to …   Historical dictionary of Marxism

  • Bibliography —   INTRODUCTION   The imposing number of books and articles that have been published in recent years about the Holocaust has made it necessary to prioritize the literature in regard to significance. As a consequence, a bibliography of the… …   Historical dictionary of the Holocaust

  • Bibliography —    I. INTRODUCTION    The bibliography is arranged by classes and subclasses. With very few exceptions, only works published after 1945 have been included. For historical works, one should consult George Black s A Gypsy Bibliography (Edinburgh:… …   Historical dictionary of the Gypsies